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  • Zero Strategist 5:57 pm on February 9, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , ,   

    #4Change February Twitter Chat Topic: Cause Fatigue 

    Running campaigns in support of one or many great causes can be very time consuming and demanding for all of those who are determined to make a change. It seems easier in the beginning when a fresh campaign for a cause is just launched – supporters are jumping on board, influencers are engaged, buzz is flying about, awareness is spreading, change is happening. But what happens when the social magic begins to wear off and change starts to feel more like a chore then a contribution?

    The #4Change Topic for February is Cause Fatigue. The Twitter chat will occur on Thursday, February 11th 2010 at 5PM EST / 2PM PST US. The topic idea for this month’s chat was spawned during last month’s #4Change chat on campaigning. In keeping with the tradition of these chats, we want to keep things open, organic, and dynamic.

    Definitions:

    Fatigue (Noun)

    • temporary loss of strength and energy resulting from hard physical or mental work
    • boredom resulting from overexposure to something
    • the feeling of being bored by something tedious
    • a flaw or weak point

    Fatigue (Verb)

    • get tired of something or somebody
    • exhaust or tire through overuse or great strain or stress

    Source: Visual Thesaurus

    #4Change February Chat Questions:

    1. How do you define cause fatigue?
    2. What are some of the contributing factors to cause fatigue?
    3. What strategies can be used to reinvigorate support for a cause when supporters get burned out?
    4. When do you expand your campaign to outreach to new supporters?
    5. When do you contract your campaign to focus on the supporters you do have?
    6. What tools can be used to keep communities engaged in the midst of cause fatigue?
    7. How do economic conditions effect cause fatigue?
    8. How can cause fatigue be prevented?
    9. How do you “recharge” when completely fatigued?

    New to #4Change? Learn More:

    To learn more about #4Change monthly twitter chat go to the #4Change Blog, read about #4Change and search twitter for #4Change. To participate just join in twitter conversation from anywhere in the world.

    Disclosure – This post is cross-posted on Zero Strategist and #4Change Blogs

     
  • Morgan 2:38 am on January 28, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: how to   

    How to Facilitate Effective #4change Chats (Or Any Global Twitter Chat) 

    Participating in the monthly #4change chats can be a rewarding experience.  You get to connect with a lot of people (globally!) and seed ideas that you couldn’t normally.  While the nature of the chats are informal, their value comes from the knowledge and connection you gain in the conversation.

    They do take a bit of coordination though – and I am a perpetual newbie at it:

    • What needs to happen before a chat to prepare?
    • What happens if no one attends?
    • How do you find questions to ask?
    • How do you keep the conversation going?

    Thankfully, our core #4change team has some great collective experience on running Twitter chats.

    Here are my formatted and remixed versions of their responses:

    What needs to happen before a chat to prepare?

    Amy : “blog posts, tweets, share on facebook, etc.”

    Tom : I think it’s preparation that makes a good chat:

    • having questions prepared
    • reaching out to relevant people to participate
    • strong general publicity/buzz building

    Tash : For me, preparation is similar to an offline discussion environment:

    • preparing links and resources
    • thinking about discussion questions(and running them past people who are experts in the area)
    • thinking about how the conversation might flow from one topic to another and so on

    Hot tip: I’ve also found it helps to do a mixture of general tweets about the event to all my followers, and specific invites to people who would add expertise and particular points of view to the conversation.

    Eddie: Identify influencers and invite through multi channels; perhaps email is more personal/ one-on-one.

    Hot tip: Vary each chat with people – early adopters, newbies, specialized knowledge brokers: adds value to the chat.


    What happens if no one attends?

    Amy: Well, you should at least have the 4change crew attending! and hopefully it wouldn’t take long for us to have a conversation that’s interesting that pulls in others.

    Hot tip: As part of the item above, it’s helpful I found to invite people directly via twitter the day or so before to be sure it’s on their radar.

    Morgan: It seems this can be a problem with offline events too!  I’d venture that it goes back to having a strong ‘core’ of people to work with + marketing (a week in advance, a day before, the day of).  Would love to hear from other Twitter convo leaders on this…#journchat?  What say you?


    How do you find questions to ask?

    Amy: With the January topic for example, I thought about all of the issues and valuable conversations that could come from a discussion on the topic and then boiled those down to the open-ended questions that would invite such issues or conversations to emerge.

    • Hot tip: I posted the questions the morning-of in the original blog post so that I had them to refer to.


    How do you keep the conversation going?

    Amy: I tried to pace questions about every 15-30 min, depending on how the tweet stream was going.  I also never, I don’t think, actually answered a question myself…

    Hot tip: …(ask) people to dive deeper into their comments or further explain their thoughts – that…(means)…a one tweet answer would become 4 tweets of explanation that others…(can)…comment on.

    Tom: With good questions and some good guests conversation seems to flow pretty naturally. You’ll know when it’s time to move to the next question based on the volume and quality of the conversation going on, but once you do I think moving clearly on to the next question is critical, otherwise the conversation bleeds too much (it will always do this a bit) and becomes confusing.

    Hot tip: monitor the volume and quality of the conversation constantly.  That way, you’ll know when it’s time to move on to the next question.

    Tash: Once the conversation starts, I think it’s a matter of watching the discussion level and adapting the question flow to that.  As Amy says, asking people to expand on particular points or provide case studies can also be a way to draw out conversation rather than going on to the next question.

    Eddie: moderate talking through backchannels (Skype, GChat) – to anticipate/coordinate should any problems arise. Identify two or three key learning outcomes/action points.  Parapharsing and reflecting conversation – ensure ppl understand tweets. (through RTs and questions).

    • Hot tip: have a back channel set up with your core staff to anticipate/coordinate should the need arise.  Twitter has been known to fail…


    In Closing

    I’d also like to add a note about follow up.  It’s good to say thank you to all participants (you are still demanding peoples’ ideas and attention).  It should also go without saying that a ‘recap’ should be written by the moderator highlighting some key take-aways from the conversation.

    Hot tip: as a final question, ask what key ‘take aways’ participant had from the conversation – it’ll make writing that recap much easier!

    As these are global conversations, you’ll be chatting with people in different time zones.  Try to be sensitive to their needs as they may need to go offline after a long day (or perhaps still need more sleep!).  For reference, our Twitter chats run the 2nd Thursday of the month at 2pm PST which corresponds to:

    • 5-7pm US Eastern Time (GMT-4)
    • 10pm-12am UK
    • 7-9am Australian EST (on the second Friday of the month)

    What kinds of tips or suggestions might you have to add?  Anything you might change or subtract?

    *Big thanks to Amy Sample Ward for originally writing about Using Twitter for a Global Conversation too!

     
  • amysampleward 12:38 pm on January 15, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , online campaigns, recap   

    Campaigning #4change Recap 

    Starting off 2010, the monthly #4change Twitter chat focused on the topic of campaigning with social media.  There were quite a few participants and some really great conversation.  I’ve tried to pull out some of the relevant tweets from the Twitter stream to help follow the flow of the conversation in case you missed it.

    This is more of a transcript than a recap, more of what I hope can be a refresher or stimulator for follow up blogs than simply the whole story itself.  Please leave a comment or use the #4change hashtag to tweet  your post if you do write something of your own!

    Question 1: How do we define campaigning in the context of social media?

    amysampleward: does growing a Facebook Fan page numbers count? does growing an email list count? what about calls to action that aren’t online?

    rootwork: In terms of #s, the easiest things to measure (FB fans, Twitter followers, web hits) seem least useful in online organizing

    rootwork: I strongly believe list building w/ petitions etc. that are NOT actually effective for the movement is abusive of one’s supporters

    annanten: @rootwork list building is just a strategy to engage more folks in your campaign

    ChristinasWorld: I think campaigning has to do w/achieving a particular end – not building a fb fan page, but using that page to achieve x, y or z

    engagejoe: Hmm…What about ‘using webby tools 2 organize ppl for impact on an array of issues, w/the goal of creating real world change?’

    annanten: @rootwork list building is just a strategy to engage more folks in your campaign

    rootwork: @annanten To me the goal should be change, not growing one’s base. 200 engaged members are better than 20,000 petition-signers

    SethHorwitz: Seth from Philly here @rootwork altho building lists is not signif per se, NE1 of those low barrier entrants may bcome an advocate

    realize_ink: Q1. A campaign (in my definition) is anything that mobilizes action

    annanten: social media is here to help you empower your followers with a story to create powerful activists for your cause

    lozz: @amysampleward Campaigning is obsolete – social media disrupts “start-end” mentality – constantly adapting efforts now

    paddaniels: @realize_ink SM changing the way we see campaigning as not only r small acts of giving visible but so is the collective outcome

    ChristinasWorld: building a network of awareness is different from campaigning: 1) campaigning is about mobilizing action toward specific objectives 

    ChristinasWorld: 2) Network building is about communicating, telling stories, & building trust over time

    realize_ink: @christinasworld I agree completely! Good campaigns move away from awareness 2 spur action

    annanten: @engagejoe online campaigning = (relationship building + storytelling) * shared cause ^ common goal

    SethHorwitz: @christinasworld: agree w/ distinction betw. network building (awareness, trust) and campaigning (action). Both important.

    Question #2: what are some of the best examples you’ve seen? Why are they great?

    @elliotharmon Here’s a good example from just today of the wrong way to use social media http://bit.ly/88sR45

    creativegreeniu: The 350 campaign is one of the best uses of social media I’ve experienced and it worked on a worldwide basis.

    creativegreeniu: and why the 350 campaign worked is because it effectively reached a diverse demographic & moved them to action on a complex goal

    ChristinasWorld: @kanter‘s recent campaign 4 Sharing Found. was amazing – what made it great was existing network ready to take action when called

    5MillionPeople: GetUp in Oz do it well. Many of their online campaigns are short and sharp.

    cian: Big up to @350‘s work. So successful at creating real world actions. do they in themselves create behavioral change too

    realize_ink: @creativegreeniu I’d add to that, it succeeded b/c it moved ppl toward a *specific* goal

    5MillionPeople: @realize_ink: Agreed. Works best when people can see that action leads to affect. Specific goals help focus.

    neddotcom: Another campaign worth mentioning http://twestival.com/

    rootwork: I remember a campaign from some time ago about getting more women on tech panels, but can’t find specific blogs abt it.

    annanten: @realize_ink @rootwork indeed – it was @WomenWhoTech who lead that – http://bit.ly/y2twf

    rootwork: I think the Jena Six was an early (though not the first) success of social media campaigns http://bit.ly/5hKmih

    rootwork: The Powershift youth climate change conf in 2007 was also largely organized via social media http://bit.ly/8MyWtH

    elliotharmon: Great example of organizing people online: Sean Tevis campaign. http://bit.ly/5VSjxh

    rootwork: @tomjd @bensaint My Society @mysociety is incredibly awesome. Produce great tools for effective UK campaigns

    Question #3: What are elements in these examples that are integral to the campaign’s success?

    realize_ink: Q3: specific ask.

    rootwork: Key element for success, to me, is allowing ppl to speak in own voice, e.g. http://jointheimpact.com was abt ppl, not an org

    rootwork: Creating a sustainable org #4change is good, but not at the expense of cultivating leadership among activists IMO

    rootwork: Great repository of online campaigns #4change can be found at @DigiActive – lots to analyze: http://bit.ly/4BbKWG

    creativegreeniu: Direct contact from national 350 organizers incredibly effective in motivating me. I used that tactic locally 2 move others to act.

    creativegreeniu: first step is recognizing value & necessity of it and specifically asking campaigners to do it.

    zerostrategist: Q3: I think Access 2 the net, uncensored information, being unmonitored or not fearing reprisals for being an active are important

    engagejoe: ‘An element that’s integral 2 a campaign’s success?’ Agree w/@rootwork‘s highlights: truly valuing & empowering supporters is key.

    zerostrategist: Google / China comes to mind! Thank god for SMS, proxy servers & smart mobs right?

    ChristinasWorld: key to good campaign is offering meaningful action for supporters to take; having a network who is ready to take action helps alot

    realize_ink: Q3: empowerment & ownership

    realize_ink: @amysampleward Giving ppl the opportunity 2 make it their own. Like @350 encouraged ppl’s cr8ivity 2 bring change but hd 1 ask<

    ChristinasWorld: @amysampleward sharing thru soc med can help maintain an action network – don’t just talk to supporters when u need something

    5MillionPeople: @amysampleward: A big part of it is surely about making sure your network feel their actions are having an effect.

    ChristinasWorld: Building an effective network #4change who is ready 2 take action requires consistency – sharing stories, building trust in an ongoing way

    rootwork: Be honest w/ppl about how a given action gets the movement closer to change. Like a lg version of mission line-of-sight

    neddotcom: Cluetrain may be 10 years old, but was 20 years ahead of its time, very related to social media today http://cluetrain.com/

    ehon: Online campaigning – the power offer to stakeholders needs to be designed and executed properly & strategically.

    Question #4: What are the most difficult aspects of managing/running a campaign?

    engagejoe:  another best-practice for online campaigning? making it about the cause, not the org(s) that’s coordinating it.

    rootwork Giving up control.

    ehon: @engagejoe @rootwork valuing & empowering is obvious. Most campaigns lack long-term strategic plan to keep momentum flowing.

    SocialBttrfly: @amysampleward For me, one of the more frustrating items, not nec. difficult, is overcoming the campaign mentality.

    SocialBttrfly: Along lines of what @ehon was saying. Needs a strategic plan. Most campaigns address short term and focus on one P, promotion.

    realize_ink: Q4: in some instances, seeing campaign as a tactic, not the entire strategy.

    realize_ink: camp strat brings u closer 2 achieving org strat. camp success = met org objective. org success = worked out of a job.

    ChristinasWorld: Q4 I think keeping up campaign momentum can be tiring for campaign champions. I hate that feeling of bugging people

    zerostrategist: @christinasworld It IS tiring, mastering the art of the “light touch / soft ask” is not easy to keep that campaign momentum going

    zerostrategist: @christinasworld I found that when you run a great social media campaign, other champions and supporters can help keep that going

    SocialBttrfly I personally like the term “initiative” vs. “campaign.” “Initiative” tends to get people motivated and is action-focused.

    neddotcom: Is your campaign for good push or pull? America’s Giving Challenge = push vs. Kiva peer-to-peer microfinance = pull

    neddotcom: Pull can be more effective because people are coming directly to you, hopefully in great numbers and ready to do something

    SocialBttrfly: I can expand in a post. In ways, it’s semantics. But the word campaign, to me, says push rather than a fueling a movement.

    ehon: Challenge w online campaign – lots of sympathisers not enough activists. Inspiration doesn’t transform to action.

    rootwork: .@ehon That’s why “awareness-building” is such a limited goal. I’ll take “action-building” or “change-building”!

    zerostrategist: @ehon Might be right about that challenge, but I have seen the reverse too. Where everyone wants to lead but no one wants 2 follow

    Question #5: What are the best ways for would-be campaigners to identify possible collaborators/partners?

    engagejoe w/online campaigning, seems a (natural?) challenge 2 coordinate w/other movement builders working on same issue

    rootwork: With social media, it seems easy (maybe too easy!) to find the natural leaders & activists and bring them into the “inner circle”

    rootwork: But I think that leadership cultivation is key. Someone always Tweeting out yr action alerts? See if they want to help plan them!

    ChristinasWorld: Q5  thinking of @kanter & #tweetsgiving, seems clear that existing networks built over time produce strong natural collaborators

    ChristinasWorld: btw – meant @kanter‘s recent b-day campaign & #tweetsgiving from @epicchange as 2 examples where collaborators identify themselves

    engagejoe:  w/@christinasworld that building on & seeking connections from yr ntworks makes for a gr8 starting place 2 find potential partners

    Question #6 – something people always ask me:  how do you measure impact of campaigns (esp w/ social media)?

    ChristinasWorld: Measuring impact of #4change soc med campaigns: count unique actions/donors/RTs/shares/posts… but most important, was objective achieved?

    zerostrategist: Q6 Most SM people say that it’s the number of “social actions” taken during campaign period, but I think it is much more then that #4change

    zerostrategist: Q6: The fact is many things are just just not measurable even with the best tools so pay, attention to tangibles & intangibles!

    zerostrategist: Q6: Do the best u can to setup automated systems to capture metrics, look at the numbers, but don’t obsess over them or the ROI

    Steveistall: @zerostrategist Agreed! It’s much more important to measure outcomes (especially behaviour change) than to measure outputs

    engagejoe w/@zerostrategist that “How do you measure impact?” will never be as easy as counting clicks, challenges & solutions too complex.

    engagejoe few measurement of success: Did you build relationships? Is the mvmnt bigger, stronger? Are we closer 2 our goals?

    zerostrategist: @christinasworld Like how can you measure the depth of a “social action” or an interaction with a human (virtual or physical)?

    sdmediareform: Measure campaigns by if it is helping advance community exposure. Ask around…

    engagejoe social media also offers a gr8 opportunity 2 discover, seek out, & highlight the stories which may show the success of a campaign

    —–

    Future chats:

    The idea was suggested during the chat last night that next month we discuss the issue of “Cause Fatique.”  I think there are lots of stories to tell, questions to ask, and examples to share on this topic and hope you’ll join us!

    You can stay on top of the #4change topic by following the hashtag on Twitter or following the blog at:

    http://4change.memeshift.com

     
    • John B. Johnson 1:47 pm on September 11, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the great
      content!

  • amysampleward 2:59 pm on January 3, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , campaigns, case studies, Delicious, , , , strategy,   

    January #4Change Topic: Campaigning 

    The January #4Change Twitter Chat will focus on the use of Twitter and other social media tools in campaigning.

    About the Topic

    Campaigning can mean many different things and we want to keep the definition of the topic fairly open for this chat, in order to keep insights, resources and conversation in the Q/A format as open to valuable input as possible.  Here are some ways that campaigning can be framed for the purpose of this chat:

    • moving canvassing door to door to online networks
    • political action
    • local community building
    • tying communications, partners, and actions together via social media
    • social change projects or programs locally or globally

    The way we examine the use of social media in campaigning can be further framed in some of these ways:

    1. change campaigns (internal vs external), also organization type variations
    2. social media change campaigns (specific nuances)
    3. change campaigns vs political campaigns (similarities vs differences)
    4. educational campaigns (organizational / institutional / internet) riffing off of last month’s topic
    5. building campaign coalitions & recruiting campaign champions

    How to Participate

    Share your ideas now:

    You can share your ideas about the topic as well as any resources, case studies, examples, research etc. by leaving a comment on this blog post.  Or, you can tag your resources or posts using Delicious with the tag “4change” and we’ll pick it up for you.

    Join the Twitter chat:

    1. If you want to contribute to the conversation, you’ll need to have a twitter account (it’s free).
    2. To follow the conversation (whether you are planning to contribute or not), use http://search.twitter.com or another application to search on Twitter for #4Change
    3. Jump in to the conversation by adding #4Change to your Twitter message
    4. Feeling brave? Check out TweetChat – it’s a great application that integrates with your Twitter account and makes chats more fun! You can turn it off after the chat.

    Rules for #4Change Chat

    1. #4Change will be structured around a series of questions which all participants can respond to. Send your questions to @memeshift to have them considered.
    2. Introduce yourself in 1 tweet at the start or when you join.
    3. Stay on topic!
    4. Be cool.

    Details

    • Date: January, 14th 2010
    • When: 2 – 4 pm US Pacific Time, 5 – 7 pm US Eastern Time, 10pm – 12am London, UK (Late!)
    • Where: Twitter (search for #4Change)
    • Topic: Campaigning: How is social/new media affecting the the way we build and conduct campaigns? and more!

    We’ll update this post with specific questions to be asked during the chat and will capture resources and conversations from the chat, too.  Send us your ideas!

    —–

    UPDATE: Here are the conversation starters we’ll be using in tonight’s chat.

    1. How do we define campaigning in the context of social media?
    - does growing a Facebook Fan page numbers count?
    - does growing an email list count?
    - what about calls to action that aren’t online?

    2. Given our definition, what are some of the best examples you’ve seen? Why?

    3. What are elements in these examples that are integral to the campaign’s success?

    4. What are the most difficult aspects of managing/running a campaign?

    5. What are the best ways for would-be campaigners to identify possible collaborators/partners?
    - other orgs to champion campaign
    - sponsors to put some skin ($) in the game
    - influencers and influential communities to reach out to and engage

    Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

     
    • Cian O'Donovan 12:23 pm on January 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Looking forward to the #4change chat all, unfortunately I'll be on a train for most but I'll catch it on the other side I hope.

    • Frugal Dougal 12:44 pm on January 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      A very good idea that coulp complement the use of shoe leather and meetings in draughty rooms to bring about change but, please God, not replace them.

    • Morgan Sully 4:42 pm on January 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      great chat today so far – @engagejoe @ChristinasWorld: future topic on cause fatigue and growing networks over time looks like a winner – “Growing Your Network Over Time Without Working Over Time”:)

    • cian 7:23 pm on January 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Looking forward to the #4change chat all, unfortunately I'll be on a train for most but I'll catch it on the other side I hope.

    • Frugal Dougal 7:44 pm on January 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      A very good idea that coulp complement the use of shoe leather and meetings in draughty rooms to bring about change but, please God, not replace them.

    • Morgan Sully 11:42 pm on January 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      great chat today so far – @engagejoe @ChristinasWorld: future topic on cause fatigue and growing networks over time looks like a winner – “Growing Your Network Over Time Without Working Over Time”:)

  • Morgan 1:34 pm on December 9, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    December #4change Chat: Education 

    About This Chat

    Education and it’s discontents are being changed by new ways of learning – much of it by new ways of creating, sharing and validating information and knowledge online.  Tools and methods are being customized, adapted and remixed for various educational contexts.  Classrooms are no longer bound by geography.  But there are still barriers, still challenges – some of which we may not be able to predict.  How can we attend to these?

    This chat will cover the changing role(s) of teachers, institutions and learners – and how they are affected and transformed by new/social media.

    Details

    • Date: December, 10th 2009
    • When: 2 – 4 pm US Pacific Time, 5 – 7 pm US Eastern Time, 10pm – 12am London, UK (Late!)
    • Where: Twitter (search for #4Change)
    • Topic: Education: How is social/new media affecting the future of education?

    Starter questions

    Below, are some starter questions for our chat.  Have another question not attended to below?  Leave a comment below and tag it with #4change (there’ll be an option to Tweet it out)

    • Are classrooms relevant anymore?
    • How can we support the role of educators?
    • What happens when education becomes decentralized?
    • What role does gaming play in education?
    • How can we leverage the stability of traditional institutions while encouraging the adaptability of new networks?
    • How can we reconcile extreme diversity with coherent and appropriate learning communities?

    Join the Conversation!

    1. If you want to contribute to the conversation, you’ll need to have a twitter account (it’s free).
    2. To follow the conversation (whether you are planning to contribute or not), use http://search.twitter.com or another application to search on Twitter for #4Change
    3. Jump in to the conversation by adding #4Change to your Twitter message
    4. Feeling brave? Check out TweetChat – it’s a great application that integrates with your Twitter account and makes chats more fun! You can turn it off after the chat.

    Rules for #4Change Chat

    1. #4Change will be structured around a series of questions which all participants can respond to. Send your questions to @memeshift to have them considered.
    2. Introduce yourself in 1 tweet at the start or when you join.
    3. Stay on topic!
    4. Be cool.

    Resources

    Below are some great places to draw from before, during and after our chat!

    1. Resilient School Communities
    2. Amplified Educators and Learners
    3. A Global Learning Economy
    4. Design as Philosophy
    5. Contested Authorities
    6. Diversifying Learning Geographies: Deserts and Oases

    Join us for the chat this Thursday – I look forward to discussing the role social media (and teachers!) can play in shaping the future of education.

     
    • Morgan Sully 5:33 pm on December 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Report back on December #4change chat: Feel free to add in your own takeaways from today!

      In attendance: @timjeffries, @zerostrategist, @amysampleward, @ehon, @tomjd, @danmcquillan

      Here's some of my takeaways/quotes and who said them:

      @timjeffries
      I think classrooms have a place still, we use them as a safe space to debrief what we've learnt out in the city.
      if you don't know what ur doing with tech or don't believe what you are teaching, they'll know
      Students know that teachers don't know everything (who possibly could?). So why pretend? Learn together
      I think integrity is really important. Particularly teenagers have great bullshit detectors.

      @zerostrategist
      think when education becomes more decentralized, it becomes more accessible to other people who normally can't/don't participate
      power shifts to the students, it reemphasises relationships in learning.
      web 2.0 presents a unique opportunity to humanize teachers & thus make materials more accessible to students
      While some need to write more to learn, others need to listen, or see or apply the material in different settings.
      Also remember every individual student has their own learning style, some based on different combos of experience

      @ehon
      tailored to small niche rather than big generalise lecture. creates more diversity, build more individual potentials.
      i think the shift is for students to learn to do – rather than to learn 'about'.
      physical attendance at lectures is still deem important to traditional academics.
      academics reported easier to reach n engage students but most academics couldnt be bothered to learn to use it
      great n quick way of sharing resources but mixed rxns. Some students don't like academics access their private life.

      @tomjd
      here's some great examples of using cell phones for literacy http://bit.ly/503IXF. Mobile + social tech critical 2 edu

      @socialedge
      Classrooms key @ Digital StudyHall video tech extend reach of skilled teachers into underprivileged classrooms http://bit.ly/8AV8Oc
      No classroom @ Khan Academy-900 videos YouTube-w/6 million views-arithmetic to calculus, chemistry, physics http://bit.ly/8Kf4cR

      @memeshift
      Educator's job is to shed light on the learning goal, but encourage individual paths to that.
      brilliant example on teaching kids about the internet #twitterkids http://bit.ly/6dAfd1

      If you've got any others, feel free to reply to this comment.

    • Morgan Sully 12:33 am on December 11, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Report back on December #4change chat: Feel free to add in your own takeaways from today!

      In attendance: @timjeffries, @zerostrategist, @amysampleward, @ehon, @tomjd, @danmcquillan

      Here's some of my takeaways/quotes and who said them:

      @timjeffries
      I think classrooms have a place still, we use them as a safe space to debrief what we've learnt out in the city.
      if you don't know what ur doing with tech or don't believe what you are teaching, they'll know
      Students know that teachers don't know everything (who possibly could?). So why pretend? Learn together
      I think integrity is really important. Particularly teenagers have great bullshit detectors.

      @zerostrategist
      think when education becomes more decentralized, it becomes more accessible to other people who normally can't/don't participate
      power shifts to the students, it reemphasises relationships in learning.
      web 2.0 presents a unique opportunity to humanize teachers & thus make materials more accessible to students
      While some need to write more to learn, others need to listen, or see or apply the material in different settings.
      Also remember every individual student has their own learning style, some based on different combos of experience

      @ehon
      tailored to small niche rather than big generalise lecture. creates more diversity, build more individual potentials.
      i think the shift is for students to learn to do – rather than to learn 'about'.
      physical attendance at lectures is still deem important to traditional academics.
      academics reported easier to reach n engage students but most academics couldnt be bothered to learn to use it
      great n quick way of sharing resources but mixed rxns. Some students don't like academics access their private life.

      @tomjd
      here's some great examples of using cell phones for literacy http://bit.ly/503IXF. Mobile + social tech critical 2 edu

      @socialedge
      Classrooms key @ Digital StudyHall video tech extend reach of skilled teachers into underprivileged classrooms http://bit.ly/8AV8Oc
      No classroom @ Khan Academy-900 videos YouTube-w/6 million views-arithmetic to calculus, chemistry, physics http://bit.ly/8Kf4cR

      @memeshift
      Educator's job is to shed light on the learning goal, but encourage individual paths to that.
      brilliant example on teaching kids about the internet #twitterkids http://bit.ly/6dAfd1

      If you've got any others, feel free to reply to this comment.

  • Natasha 3:10 pm on November 2, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    Volunteering #4change 

    Social media and new technology are changing the way we recruit and manage volunteers.  They’re also changing how we define the concept of volunteering.  New forms of participation such as micro-volunteering, and web-generated events such as Twestival, are changing the way people are coming together to raise funds, donate their time and make a difference in their local and global community.

    Our next #4change chat, on Thursday 12 November, will look at how the volunteering landscape is changing.  Join us for a global conversation, sharing ideas, best practice, links and resources.

    How to join the chat

    1. If you want to contribute to the conversation, you’ll need to have a Twitter account (it’s free).
    2. To follow the conversation (whether you are planning to contribute or not), use  http://search.twitter.com/ or another application to search on Twitter for “#4Change”
    3. Jump in to the conversation by adding “#4Change” (without the “”) to your Twitter message
    4. Feeling brave? Check out TweetChat – it’s a great application that integrates with your Twitter account and makes chats more fun! You can turn it off after the chat.

    Rules for #4Change chat

    1. #4Change will be structured around a series of questions which all participants can respond to. Send your questions to @tashjudd or post them below to have them considered.
    2. Introduce yourself in 1 tweet at the start or when you join.
    3. Stay on topic!
    4. Be cool.

    A few links

    How social media’s changing volunteering

    Blog: Brave New World for Volunteering
    Blog: Sacrifice, optional and about other people (defining volunteering) 
    Blog: The Extraordinaries: Will micro-volunteering work?
    Article: NetSquared and the new wave of online volunteering

    Recruiting volunteers online

    VolunteerMatch
    Do-it
    All for Good

    A few interesting volunteering and participation initiatives

    The Extraordinaries
    Virtual volunteering
    Junction49
    Urbantastic
    Twestival

    Please comment below with other interesting links, case studies and questions you’d like to see raised during the chat.  Looking forward to seeing you all online on the 12th.

     
  • engagejoe 7:05 pm on October 6, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    Next #4Change Twitter Chat: Social Media & the Climate Change Movement – Join Us! 

    Every month, a group called #4Change organizes open & lively conversations about how web-connected communities and our use of social media tools are helping to create change in the world. #4Change Chats are hosted on Twitter – Read “Join the Conversation” below for ways to jump into the discussion.

    The next #4change chat is this Thursday – we hope you can join us!

    Details:

    • Date: Oct, 8th
    • Where: Twitter (search for #4Change)
    • When: 2 – 4 pm US Pacific Time, 5 – 7 pm US Eastern Time, 10pm – 12am London, UK (Late!)
    • Topic: How does the web & social media change the way we address climate change?


    (Image from Blog Action Day - their topic this year is also climate change!)

    We are at a crucial moment in time for the climate movement (and all of humanity). World leaders are meeting in Copenhagen in December to draft the next major global climate treaty – and organizations, communities, and people from every corner of the planet are stepping up to make sure this treaty gets our planet back on a sustainable path. Copenhagen is a galvanizing force that’s driving a lot of innovations and experiments – which means there’s going to be lots to discuss! Many of the questions we explore will likely also be applicable to other movements.

    Starting the Conversations:

    Here are some questions to consider:

    • How does online discussion and networking connect with and support offline action?
    • How does the web change the way we organize for climate action? What are the key ways the game gets changed?
    • What role does new media & storytelling play in this space?
    • What are the impact of online petitions and how can they be most effective?
    • How can we help connect & empower the climate movement together using online tools? What technologies are both available & needed?
    • How can the web facilitate culture shifts? As network weavers, how can we faciitate culture shifts?
    • What are the top actions the social media community can take to join and support the climate movement?

    And here are some examples to consider:

    • TckTckTck, 350.org, Avaaz, 1Sky, Energy Action Coalition, many others – All wired organizations working to catalyze and inspire people and communities to come together and take action for the climate.
    • Project Survival – Seven new media teams, one for each continent, will report on the most compelling climate stories from around the world.
    • WiserEarth & WiserEarth API – Open database of over 100,000 environmental & social justice organizations anyone can search and webby folk can integrate into their site.

    Join the Conversation!

    1. If you want to contribute to the conversation, you’ll need to have a twitter account (it’s free).
    2. To follow the conversation (whether you are planning to contribute or not), use http://search.twitter.com or another application to search on Twitter for “#4Change”
    3. Jump in to the conversation by adding “#4Change” (without the “”) to your Twitter message
    4. Feeling brave? Check out TweetChat – it’s a great application that integrates with your Twitter account and makes chats more fun! You can turn it off after the chat.

    Rules for #4Change Chat

    1. #4Change will be structured around a series of questions which all participants can respond to. Send your questions to @engagejoe to have them considered.
    2. Introduce yourself in 1 tweet at the start or when you join.
    3. Stay on topic!
    4. Be cool.

    Join us for the chat this Thursday – looking forward to discussing the role social media can play in creating a safe climate future!

     
    • carolgregor 12:28 pm on October 7, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      CarolGregor.com,
      Builder, designer, writer, film maker
      What if the solutions we seek are impossible for only one reason? What if it is simple to accomplish your goals if there are different tools used in analyzing the problem?
      What if how we learn is the problem, not our ability to solve the problem?
      It is not what we know but how we see our connection that holds the solutions.
      Socrates”Man is the measure of all things”

    • Morgan Sully 1:41 am on November 15, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      I'm helping environmental activist learn how to make media tomorrow that can be distributed online. Our main question is: how do we connect local stories to national stories having to do with environmental justice.

      Maps seem to be a great tool for visualizing these networks of collaborations, partnerships ans stories… Here's my link. Wish me luck!

      http://curiousworks.allaroundyou.com.au/2009/11

    • oleander 2:16 am on February 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I am delighted to join this chat. Being a conservationist and a great lover of the outdoors, I am constantly looking for forums or social networking sites where I can learn more about our planet and meet interesting people. I am pretty sure this site will not disappoint.

    • nature essays 9:16 am on February 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I am delighted to join this chat. Being a conservationist and a great lover of the outdoors, I am constantly looking for forums or social networking sites where I can learn more about our planet and meet interesting people. I am pretty sure this site will not disappoint.

    • Richey Hope 10:44 am on September 17, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Very good
      article! I read with pleasure. Thank you.

  • tomjd 3:09 pm on October 5, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , video   

    Non-profit video: Ashoka at the Clinton Global Initiative 

    During the week of  September 21 I was laid up with a bad back and while I was it was very cool to see all the videos produced by the Ashoka Team at the Clinton Global Initiative. The increasing use of video at Ashoka, and at citizen sector organizations overall, is wonderful to see. A year ago Ashoka’s approach to video was very traditional – footage would be shot and, time-permitting, edited into something usable. Now the focus is on fast, one-take, minimally edited videos that can be shared live or very rapidly with our online audience. It’s our immersion into social media that inspires this new approach – being involved in a real-time conversation with our supporters and peers creates an emphasis on timeliness and humanness. To this end people from different parts of the Ashoka family where profiled at CGI: Fellows, staff and supporters.

    It was the first-time we’ve emphasized video as a reporting tool from a live event like this. We have learnt a lot from this pilot and will be using this learning to better cover future events, including our Tech 4 Society conference in Hyderabad India in February next year, one of the biggest gatherings we have hosted.

    These learnings include improved coordination between the production of videos and the conversation at and about the event. For instance, if we see an Ashoka Fellow or staff member saying something interesting or profound over their twitter feed we should try and grab them as soon as possible and get them to expand on those thoughts on video. This would more powerfully embed our videos into the conversation, rather than just using the twitter conversation as just an outreach platform.

    The ongoing development of Ashoka’s online communities and the clear interest and enthusiasm for stories from the Ashoka network has inspired this greater focus on developing timely content that can be shared with these communities. The understanding of the importance and benefits of this approach is becoming widespread across the organization, such that it barely requires me to suggest let alone implement these efforts. And that, to me, is the most exciting thing of all, evidence of the real culture-change taking place at Ashoka as we become more social, more participatory and more focused on storytelling.

    Here are a couple of my favourite of our videos from CGI:

    Ashoka Fellow Harmish Hande:

    And a super-cute video with my boss, head of Global Marketing Beverly Schwartz:

    You can see all the Ashoka CGI videos here.

    Tom is the Digital Marketing Strategist at Ashoka and a founder member of the 4change collective. This is cross-posted from Tom’s personal blog.

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    • Richey Hope 5:37 am on September 4, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the article. Great
      analysis. 

  • Zero Strategist 11:24 am on September 9, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: #FAIL, , , Failure, , , ,   

    September #4Change Chat Topic: Change Failure 

    My experience since I started working in the social media field is that the failures are where you learn the most as a community manager, a social media manger, a change manger, a professional and as a person.

    Twitter Fail Whale

    Yet, organizations tend to have a low tolerance for failure even though it is failure that often leads to innovations and improvements in products, services or processes. Leaders often blame change managers or teams who do not control the source or circumstances which cause the “failure.” Having a low tolerance for small failures can actually lead to more catastrophic failures.

    Though many orgs flaunt their “lessons learned” they are not all written down, distributed, or accessible depending on the enterprise architecture. Too often, these lessons end up on individuals’ computers, shared drives or locked away in portals and are not shared in order to prevent repeated mistakes. Most organizations lack the enterprise 2.0 tools that they need to help their workers become more efficient at their jobs.  This lack of tools can prevent individuals from learning from their previous missteps and reaching full productive work potential. There is also general lack of integrated risk management systems in business for employees to submit risks to the organization for tracking, sourcing and mitigation. The workers on the front lines of the change are often the first to see signs of trouble yet, in most org structures, they have the least interaction with upper management.

    I think that the previous blog post by Tom is a great lead into this month’s discussion and #4CHANGE chat topic.  The 4Change Team thinks that this topic is a really important. :)

    #4 Change September Chat Topic: Change Failure / Change #Fails

    #4Change Chat Questions on Change Failure:

    1. What is the value of failure?
    2. What roles do change failures play in furthering larger change campaigns in organization?
    3. What constitutes change failure / success inside and outside of your organization?
    4. As a change/community manager, how do you handle separation / transition issues with the community and the organization?
    5. How do failures in society, business and government affect change in non-profits?

    new_twitter_fail

    Here are some background definitions to stir your thoughts about this months topic.

    Failure (definitions from Visual Thesaurus):

    • an act that fails
    • an event that does not accomplish its intended purpose
    • lack of success
    • a person with a record of failing, someone who loses consistently
    • an unexpected omission
    • inability to discharge all your debts as they come due
    • loss of ability to function normally
    • condition in which there is a disturbance of normal functioning
    • a mistake resulting from neglect
    • your overall circumstances or condition in life (including everything that happens to you)
    • an event that happens
    • an act that does not achieve it’s intended goal

    Success:

    • an event that accomplishes its intended purpose
    • an attainment that is successful
    • a state of prosperity or fame
    • a person with a record of successes
    • the condition of prospering; having good fortune
    • the act of achieving an aim
    • an event that happens

    Change:

    • an event that occurs when something passes from one stat or phase to another
    • a relational difference between states; especially between states before and after some event
    • the action of changing something
    • the result of alteration or modification
    • a thing that is different phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon
    • something done (usually as apposed to something said)

    Please feel free to leave question and comments on this subject and if you have open case studies or links to resources on the topic. Cross-posted from Todd’s Zero Strategist  Blog.

     
    • Christina 6:34 am on September 24, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Confused as to why the september #4change chat history is not showing up in twitter search. I thought to have missed it – did it actually take place??

      • tomjd 3:04 pm on October 5, 2009 Permalink | Reply

        I was on vacation for the chat but it did take place, I was able to see the history in twitter search when I first returned.

    • Christina 12:34 pm on September 24, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Confused as to why the september #4change chat history is not showing up in twitter search. I thought to have missed it – did it actually take place??

  • tomjd 1:13 pm on August 26, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Clay Shirky, Creative Commons, , ,   

    Attitudinal barriers to social media success 

    Towards the end of the last #4change chat the conversation moved into discussing how most non-profits are not there yet when it comes to social media and the barriers, from the attitudinal to capacity to connectivity, standing in the way. I’ve been thinking more about these issues and want to outline further some of the attitudional barriers that were mentioned. I think it’s these attitudinal, or cultural, barriers which are the most interesting. Resource scarcity and skills shortages are always a challenge for non-profits but, ultimately, are simply a matter of prioritization. Connectivity is obviously essential and very unevenly provided across the globe and, once these other elements are in place a coherent strategy is fundamental to your success. But even with everything else lined up unless your organization has a culture which supports social media it will much less effective at it than hoped for.

    Several of these attitudinal barriers were mentioned during the #4Change chat: Fear, passivity and a desire for control.

    Fear:

    of the unknown, of not doing it right, of missing the mark. Non-profits spend a lot of time worrying about their public perception, and often caring deeply about a wealthier and, often, more conservative cohort (those able to donate substantively to charity and social change) than the population at large. A fear with offending this group can cramp an organization’s style online. You must obviously but mindful of public perception, and be deeply attuned to your brand and values, but social media does requires strategic fearlessness. You’ll make mistakes, you’ll misspell and misspeak occasionally, but learn from these mistakes and get better at social media through practice, it’s the only way.

    Passivity:

    Passivity is never a recipe for success. While it is possible to automate much of your social media, updating your Twitter feed and Facebook page via RSS when a press release or blog post is uploaded, people can tell when you’re not really present on these platforms and will be much less likely to engage with you. If you’re going to make social media a meaningful part of your outreach strategy you need to give it the time and human resources to succeed. You see this repeatedly in Facebook – seemingly every organization in the Western world has a Facebook group but most are clearly never checked, with questions and offers of help unanswered on their wall, projecting the opposite of what you’d want: disinterest. There’s nothing magic about having a Facebook group, the not-so-secret sauce is in actually using it as a space to share information and engage with people. In other words: being proactive. This is equally true for Twitter, MySpace and other social media platforms.

    A desire for control:

    Social Media allows your supports and staff to be more effective advocates for you, and nothing is more effective than people talking in their own words about something they care passionately about. But allowing people to talk in their own words risks your marketing becoming diluted, your finely-crafted messaging forgotten. This can’t be helped but can be mitigated by actively engaging with your supporters and providing them with the tools to better promote you. But if you aren’t comfortable with misspelt words and colloquialisms you’re going to find social media, and the real, human, non-pr language that comes with it, very difficult. If you’re running every draft tweet past senior executives for approval you’re not going to get anywhere.

    You can see an example of this with copyright. Does your organization use Creative Commons licenses for your online media? If not, how can you expect people to help you share your content and your message?

    As Clay Shirky said in his recent TED talk: social media is about convening your supporters, not controlling them.

    Attitudinal factors are only one of the barriers between non-profits and social media success, but they’re an often-overlooked one I believe, less obvious than resourcing issues or inadequate internal processes. I’d love to hear of any others you might have encountered. Being cognizant of these barriers allows us to more effectively lead our organizations through them, creating not only successful social media outreach strategies but more transparent, responsive and adaptive organizations in the process.

    Cross-posted from Tom’s personal blog.

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